Problem-solving and conflict coaching

Overwhelmed businessman in white shirt and tie having a headache during a stressful phone conversation. Tired thoughtful businessman with one hand on his forehead taking a tedious phone call.

Do you ever feel like there’s a revolving door to your office with one, never-ending request: Can you fix this problem for me? 

Having worked with a lot of HR people, small business owners, and managers over the years, I can tell you they pride themselves on being great problem solvers. It’s satisfying being presented with an issue and, through competence and efficiency, making it go away.

Unfortunately, this highly valuable skill has a dark side. Becoming the super hero of problem-solving leads to your phone and email blowing up with problems. Eventually the scales tip and you just can’t do it all. Taking care of everyone else leaves no time to complete your own goals. 

It is at this point, that empowering others begins to make a lot of sense.

What if, instead of problem-solving for others, you got them to solve their own problems?

Conflict Coaching is a process designed to help the person being coached understand their conflict from a variety of perspectives, determine the best possible outcome, develop and apply the skills and strategies needed to enact that outcome.

While initially it does take more time to sit with someone, hear them out, challenge their thinking, and let them grapple to find their own solution, it also decreases repeat cries for help. This means an investment of time now will save untold hours later… time you could use to solve your own problems and advance your own future.

Interested in learning more? Conflict Coaching is a field and a skill set. A quick search will identify wonderful books and resources on the topic. Or, consider attending this in-person three-day training March 29, 30, and 31 in Rochester, New York: CCM Training Flyer Rochester March 2017-2. You’ll thank yourself for the investment, your workers will thank you, and you’ll even get better at solving your own problems.

Bobbie Dillon